ARIZONA: Senate Passes Budget That BANS Teaching Anti-White Critical Race Theory

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The Arizona State Senate has included a ban on the teaching of anti-white critical race theory within its budget bill that it passed late Tuesday night.

Last month, the Arizona State Senate passed SB 1074, which prohibited the state of Arizona “or a state agency, city, town, county or political subdivision from using public monies on or requiring an employee to engage in training, orientation or therapy that presents any form of blame or judgement on the basis of race, ethnicity or sex,” ideas together that are more commonly known as “critical race theory,” an anti-white, leftist agenda.

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Specifically, the bill prevented teaching that:

  • One race, ethnic group or sex is inherently morally or intellectually superior to another race, ethnic group or sex.
  • An individual, by virtue of the individual’s race, ethnicity or sex, is inherently racist, sexist or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously.
  • An individual should be invidiously discriminated against or receive adverse treatment solely or partly because of the individual’s race, ethnicity or sex.
  • An individual’s moral character is determined by the individual’s race, ethnicity or sex.
  • An individual, by virtue of the individual’s race, ethnicity or sex, bears responsibility for actions committed by other members of the same race, ethnic group or sex.
  • An individual should feel discomfort, guilt, anguish or any other form of psychological distress because of the individual’s race, ethnicity or sex.
  • Meritocracy or traits such as a hard work ethic are racist or sexist or were created by members of a particular race, ethnic group or sex to oppress members of another race, ethnic group or sex.

However, Arizona’s RINO Governor Doug Ducey killed the bill along with 21 others only two days later, including one significant election integrity bill, declaring that the priority for the legislature should be passing the budget instead. Ducey was slammed by many in the Arizona GOP, including State Representative Mark Finchem. Finchem, who is currently running to replace Katie Hobbs as Secretary of State, said Ducey was acting like a “petty dictator” having a “manchild temper tantrum.”

Ironically, the ban on anti-white critical race theory came back even stronger as a result of the budget, not in spite of it. A much more powerful version of the bill was added as an on-floor amendment to the budget, SB1826. Instead of just restricting Arizona government entities from funding training based on critical race theory, the new amendments contained within SB1826 now ban all of the aforementioned teachings from being taught to students in schools across the state.

K-12 students must not be taught any of the above described points in any capacity, be that as a separate course, or contained within any of the school curriculum in any subject. Any teacher or school district who is found to have violated the legislation will be subject to severe sanctions, with any teacher subject to losing their teaching certificate, and fines of up to $5,000 per incident per school district.

Critical race theory has recently shot into the public consciousness in recent months, with many new pundits cropping up to lambast it as being the next big evil to tackle in American culture. Over the last week, however, some of those who have come to the forefront recently for fighting against critical race theory have turned around and attacked anybody who described it as being “anti-white,” claiming that anyone who says so are playing into the hands of so-called “white identitarians,” risking a potential race war as a result.

During Tuesday night’s edition of Tucker Carlson Tonight, Carlson introduced Chris Rufo, one such activist who recently attacked those using the term “anti-white” to describe critical race theory, and ironically told his viewers that Rufo had exposed it for being “anti-white racism.” It is unclear whether the phrasing by Carlson himself was on accident, or deliberately spoken to rebuke those activists.

The passing of SB1826 came shortly after the passing of the amended SB1824, which included another on-floor amendment that would put restrictions on the use of vaccine passports within Arizona, banning any state entity from mandating their use and preventing schools from requiring them for attendance or enrollment. However, private businesses could still choose to require them of their own volition. State Senator Wendy Rogers told National File she would be pushing for further legislation that prohibits “businesses from being able to ask customers for a vaccine passport.”