Raffensberger Deputy Jordan Fuchs Recorded Trump Call From Florida, Violated Two-Party Consent Law

24

Georgia Deputy Secretary of State Jordan Fuchs, who has been described as the true source of power in Brad Raffensperger’s office, broke Florida’s two-party consent law when she illegally recorded President Donald Trump’s conversation with Raffensperger, a highly placed source now confirms.

As National File previously reported, Atlanta Tea Party President Debbie Dooley first confirmed Jordan Fuchs leaked the audio, and Georgia GOP Chair David Shafer confirmed to National File that the leak originated in Raffensperger’s office.

Now, National File has confirmed that Fuchs confirmed she leaked the audio to an elected Republican in Georgia who is beyond reproach, and that person relayed this information to National File’s source, a highly placed individual in Georgia with direct knowledge of the Secretary of State’s office.

Covfefe Coffee

Additionally, National File has confirmed that Fuchs recorded this audio while in the Orlando area of Florida. While most of the United States have a one-party consent law, meaning only one party in a private conversation needs to give permission for the conversation to be recorded, Florida has a two-party consent law.

In other words, for Fuchs to have legally recorded and released the audio of the call between Raffensperger and President Trump, she would have first had to obtain permission from the President and all other parties on the call.

On her Twitter account, Fuchs uploaded a photo of her Delta flight leaving Georgia for Florida to visit her grandparents in Orlando on Friday, January 1. The call occurred on Saturday, January 2, when she was still in Florida. She did return until January 3.

Fuchs has since deleted the photographic evidence of her trip to Florida.

“The fact is she has confirmed to other people as well that she was in Florida from January 1st through the 3rd,” our source explained. “Her grandparents live in the Orlando area, and she recorded that call from that location.”

Criminal investigators now have the contact information for the individual Fuchs confessed to, and plan to speak to him in the near future, if they have not already, National File has learned.

Interestingly, while Raffensperger has denied having prior knowledge of the leak to The Washington Post, and claims that he did not authorize it, he has yet to publicly comment on Fuchs’ alleged lawbreaking or request her resignation.

“She should resign,” our source explained. “Raffensperger should make her resign, he has given her control of the office.”

Potentially complicating Raffensperger’s claim of innocence is a conspicuous tweet he published on January 3, the day before the leaked audio was published by the Post. In the tweet, Raffensperger warned President Trump that “the truth will come out.”

Another wrinkle for Raffensperger may have formed in an interview he offered to local media. In the interview, Raffensperger insinuated that the leak would not have happened if President Trump did not post a tweet about the private conversation.

Our source explains that Fuchs, who prior to attaining this position had no managerial experience and had only worked as a political consultant, now fears she will be fingered for committing a crime.

“Fuchs feels like she’s under attack,” the source explained. “She’s gone into a ‘political consulting’ role instead of being a good civil servant, her [Twitter] feed is now self preservation.”